When: Tuesday May 11th
Time: 16:00 -17:00 UK Time
Where: Online – Register your place.

Bringing the magnetic field measurement resolution towards that of more complex magnetic sensors, yet with the small size and ease of use of a Hall sensor, Paragraf’s graphene Hall sensor delivers the exceptional properties of graphene into magnetic field sensing applications. These unique sensors can address monitoring tasks, which conventional technologies simply cannot provide an effective solution for.

In this 30 minute (followed by ample time for Q&A) webinar, Drs Ellie Galanis and Hugh Glass will discuss how these Hall effect sensors are suited to the battery market. Here they will be of great value in battery cell analysis when investigating the validity of different battery cell chemistry derivatives and form factors under development. Using these magnetic sensors, it will be possible to get a more detailed and localised (point-to-point) understanding of battery cell behaviour.

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Speakers

Dr Ellie Galanis – BEng, PhD
Product Owner- Graphene Hall Sensors @Paragraf

Ellie was awarded a first-class degree in materials science and engineering and attained a PhD in the study of metallic crystal growth. She spent a total of 7 years on the research and development of novel materials; targeting and delivering on specific industrial demands. Ellie’s magnetic materials research has led to her participation as an active member on the committee of the UK Magnetics Society, where she is currently serving as Vice Chair. With her expertise and diverse knowledge in novel materials and their applications, Ellie subsequently held university positions aimed at commercialising and generating industrial engagement with academic research; building lasting and mutually beneficial partnerships.

Dr Hugh Glass – MChem, PhD, MRSC
Technology Owner – Graphene Hall Sensors @Paragraf

Hugh achieved a first-class Master’s degree in chemistry from the University of Surrey, focusing on the synthesis of new materials and their use in green energy applications. Hugh then moved to Cambridge University to study for a PhD in the synthesis and characterisation of novel electrode materials for batteries. This was undertaken as part of the Nanotechnology centre for doctoral training (NanoDTC), a multidisciplinary centre which exposed Hugh to a wide range of science and commercial areas; from courses on quantum mechanics, materials science and bio mimicry to short consultancy projects and business, innovation and communication courses. This experience helps Hugh bring together ideas from a wide variety of fields to advance innovation at Paragraf.

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